Welcome to Trent Family Farms, LLC. We are located on the beautiful Oregon Coast in Cloverdale, OR, and specialize in raising fresh eggs and pasture raised lamb.

Questions?

There’s a lot to know about farm fresh eggs and pasture raised lamb. So we’ve gathered some of our more frequently asked questions here. We invite you to explore this information and if you still don’t find the answer you’re looking for here, please feel free to contact us!

1. Where can I buy your eggs?

Our eggs are available for sale at the farm located at 35905 Jenck Road, Cloverdale, OR 97112. Please feel free to stop by anytime and purchase eggs from our self-serve fridge located on the front porch (cash only).

In Cloverdale, OR, our eggs can be found at Menefee’s Feed Wagon (34445 U.S. 101 S, Cloverdale, OR 97112) and Nestucca Bay Creamery (34410 U.S. 101 S, Cloverdale, OR 97112). Both are conveniently located right on Hwy. 101 in downtown Cloverdale.

Look for our eggs in Portland at Laurelhurst Market, located at 3155 E Burnside St, Portland, OR 97214.

2. What does “pasture raised” mean?

On our farm we have no cages or warehouses. Our chickens roam the pasture all day, every day, eating plants and insects along with some commercial feed. At night they roost in hen houses to keep them safe from predators.

3. How long do farm-fresh eggs stay fresh?

According to The USDA, raw eggs in the shell can be kept in the refrigerator for three to five weeks. Take eggs straight home and store them immediately in the refrigerator set at 40 °F or below. Keep them in their carton and place them in the coldest part of the refrigerator, not in the door.

4. What kind of chickens are in your flock?

Our flock is rich in diversity with many heritage and “production” type breeds, including: Plymouth Barred Rock, Australorp, Leghorn, Buff Orpington, Black Star, Red Star, Rhode Island Red, Sussex, Wyandotte, and Easter Eggers (these gals make our blue eggs!).

5. How are the lambs raised?

Our lambs are raised on their mother’s milk. When they’re old enough they go out to pasture to graze with their mothers. At about 6 months of age our lambs are ready for sale.